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Top 10 Shocking Facts about 1918 Pandemic Which are almost Similar today

Nowadays our lovely earth are battling with corona virus pandemic. almost every country in the world are struggling to fight against this enemy. until today there’s more than half million people infected with corona virus all over the world. Ok we’re not going to talk about the corona virus on this post. but we want to give you shocking facts about another pandemic which happen 100 years ago known as spanish flu. The Spanish Flu Pandemic Are Relevant to our world Today

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  1. Five hundred million people — or a third of the entire world’s population at the time — were infected and fell ill.
  2. All told, the total number of people who died of the flu is between 50 million and 100 million
  3. Nearly 70% of those deaths — something like 35 million to 70 million people! — happened over just 10 weeks in the fall of 1918.
  4. In just the United States, around 675,000 people died from the flu in one year — about the same number who have died of AIDS in the US in almost 40 years
  5. In fact, no one actually knows where the virus started
  6. Nearly 13,000 people died in Philadelphia alone, largely because of the government’s secrecy in an effort to keep up morale.
  7. This virus killed not just the very young and old but also healthy teenagers and young adults — and many died just hours or days after first experiencing symptoms.
  8. The American health system was severely overburdened, especially with so many nurses overseas because of the war.
  9. People who got the flu experienced severe fatigue, fever, and headaches. Many also suffered from a cough so severe they would turn blue, tear abdominal muscles from coughing, and bleed from the mouth, nose, and sometimes ears.
  10. The pandemic came to be known as the “Spanish flu,” but it didn’t actually start in Spain at all.
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When this new strain of influenza first hit Europe in early 1918, it spread throughout military camps on both sides of World War I. Despite this, the governments involved in the war kept it a secret because they feared that acknowledging their troops were sick could help the enemy.

That’s where Spain came in. Since it was a neutral country, it had no need to hide the truth when its people got sick, so the Spanish government and media reported what was happening. Later, when the flu was everywhere, Spain’s early candor made everyone think it originated there, but that wasn’t the case.

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